Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Blind hemming on a sewing machine

I ask you, dear readers....
Do I need the blind hem foot for my sewing machine to do blind hemming on a lightweight sweater knit?
Discuss!  :)

10 comments:

  1. I may stir up a hornet's nest with this one, but I actually don't like my blind hemming foot all that much. All the adjusting to get a nice hem takes so long that I find it faster to just catch stitch by hand. And it makes me feel all "couture". :)

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  2. I don't have a blind hemming foot and have done it. On a lightweight sweater knit you may need to fool around with tension (practice on a few scraps first)and I always need to think about how to fold everything so that I'm sewing on the hem facing, not on the front/back/sleeve. You may need to spray the fabric with some spray starch to give it a little more body and make the process easier.

    Hope this helps

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  3. I usually do not mind hand hemming at all. I was taught in 8th grade and actually think I do a good job at it, howbeit - it is time consuming. I definitely hand hem a garment if I think there's going to be a problem with show through or pic marks, but if it's a bumpy fabric or a print that stitches won't show at all I hem by machine using the blind hem foot that really is not that much help at all (IMHO), it could probably be done just as well with a regular wide zigzag foot. I'll have to give that a try one day.

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  4. If you want to blindhem by machine, that foot is made for that specific purpose. The blindhem foot has a raised blade in the center that rides along the fold of the fabric hem. When a stitch is taken, the thread is given a little slack by the raised blade, so that the stitch is not tight.

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  5. Must say I use my blind hem foot when needed, and nearlllyyyy getting the hang of it. It is a slow process, the folding, ironing etc has to be just right. But on a patterned fabric is is perfect. Don't think I would try it without the correct foot, at least without a few practice runs....

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  6. If you run a basting stitch sewing down the hem about 1/2 inch from the cut edge of your hem then it is easy to just fold the body of the garment back to do the hemstitch. No pins are even necessary. All you need is a zigzag foot where you can identify the center of the foot. Run the center of the foot along your fold back with the stitch width wide enough to just barely catch the body of the garment. You might want to test the stitch on some practice fabric first to get your settings right. I like doing a blind hem on knits sometimes. The bite which is a zigzag will give this hem some stretch and works beautifully.

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  7. My blind hem foot is my new best friend. I finally tried it after letting it sit in the box of feet my machine came with several years ago.

    It's a great tool, but it does take some practice. Perhaps your nearby sewing store will show you how to use it, and let you buy one with the knowledge that if it doesn't work for you, it's getting returned. My local shop does that.

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  8. Funny you ask after I just read a tutorial about doing a blind hem stitch without using the blind hem foot, it was actually a link at another blog that led me here: http://www.makeit-loveit.com/2011/07/blind-hem-stitch-with-a-sewing-machine.html

    I'm thinking I may try more of the blind hem stitching, right now I have a tendency to do it by hand, or a straight machine hem if I can get away with it (except knits, I'll use a very narrow zig-zag).

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  9. I have played with my blind hem foot but never used it in any of my garments =). Maybe if I used it it would become my favorite but right now I do without it. Mine was included with my machine.

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  10. For some twisted reason, I enjoy hand hemming. I've never used my blind hem foot!

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