Sunday, June 15, 2014

First time with Sashiko (in progress)

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Though my thread looks white in the pic, it is actually baby blue.  I just have to stitch the border.  The stitch lines are printed on.  I think my stitching looks better in the photo than in real life, ha ha.

May 2012:  I first heard about Sashiko at PR Weekend 2012 in NYC.  Diana Rupp was one of the guest speakers.  She had patterns with McCalls that featured Sashiko, in particular a tunic with Sashiko on the bottom.

August 2012:  ATP and I go to Perl Soho so I can buy Sashiko supplies (needle, thread)

(some other date):  I buy some Sashiko coaster  kits at The City Quilter in NYC

June 2013:  Velosewer and I go to The City Quilter.  I buy this book.

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Tonight:  I find myself with 90 free minutes and think, should I sew a pair of UW (yes, it really takes me 90 min to sew a pair of UW) or start a sashiko kit?

You can see my choice.

Wow, it is a *lot* different from cross stitching.

The book recommends a special thimble I don't have, ha ha, but I could see how it would be super useful.

The instructions with the kit are in Japanese so I don't know how many strands I'm supposed to use (in cross stitch there are 6 strands in the floss and typically 2 strands are used--though its been ages since I've done cross stitch--maybe it was 3 but I think it was 2).  Based on the amount of blue thread in the kit, I figured it was to use the entire floss, not to split it, but it is so hard to pull the needle through that I had to use my pliers. It makes me think the floss should be split into strands.

Have you ever done Sashiko?  Any recommendations for books or videos???

15 days til my work project goes live.  Then there's the stabilization period.  Then let the sewing begin again!!!


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Leafy green richness in Princeton this afternoon, with my dad, on Nassau Street.

Be well!

15 comments:

  1. This is my first time ever hearing about Sashiko. It looks pretty! BTW, I love Diana Rupp!! Her sewing book was one of my ultimate faves when I first learned to sew!

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    1. I have to relearn the trick for making knots that's in her book (I think she calls it her "parlor trick". :)

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  2. Your stitching looks great. I have not heard of Sashiko. I think I would like to unhear about it because now I have one more thing I'd like to learn to do.

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    1. Ha ha, that which is heard cannot be unheard. :)

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  3. I love the look of sashiko stitching - I've seen a great example of it on the knees of worn out jeans. Unfortunately I'm a bit lazy so if it can't be done by machine it ain't getting done! Your stitching is very admirable though

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    1. Hold on to your socks--Baby Lock makes a sashiko machine! I saw it at Sew Much More in Austin but did not try it.

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  4. Oooh fancy. I'll be watching. I'm Kristy's lazy twin... ;-)

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  5. I forgot to say that I like your blog's new look. I've been mulling the idea of changing my blog's background, but I can't find one that I like.

    I've heard of Sashiko before and I am with Kristy and Nakisha: no machine, no sew. =)

    I did cross-stitch for a while, though. I didn't know you CS'd too!

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    1. Thanks L! I have been wanting to update it for quite a while now and finally took the bull by the horns!!!

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  6. Nice sashiko sample! I definitely recommend getting the special thimble. Leather is traditionally Japanese, but the metal disk type should be fine too. I think I saw sashiko thimbles at SIL Thread the last time I was there. With the thimble, the needle is pushed through from the rear, after picking up several running stitches. This helps with keeping the straight line & I it may be a bit more fun that pliers! I started out using one of the Susan Briscoe books, which has reproducible stitching patterns. Then you can use your own cloth, linen or loosely woven cotton (double layered). There's some nice Japanese books out on modern sashiko too.
    ~Jen (NY)

    Sorry if this is a duplicate -- my last post seems to have been eaten by Blogger…

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    1. Follow up:
      This is the book I mentioned above: http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Sashiko-Sourcebook-Patterns-Inspirations/dp/0715318470/ref=la_B004MZR9OY_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1402965516&sr=1-1
      As for the modern style, try searching Etsy--or better yet--when in NYC, check out the sashiko section (downstairs) at Kinokuniya Bookstore near Bryant Park. It's great browsing for inspiration, if nothing else.
      ~Jen (NY)
      (aka occasional sashiko fanatic)

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    2. Thanks for the tips! I am going to buy the leather thimble and also check out those books-- I feel a little obsession coming on!

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  7. I use Olympus Sashiko thread and I haven't had problems pulling my thread thru my fabric. (no pliers) The thread is not like embroidery floss. It's more like Pearl Cotton. My fabric is a lt. medium weight woven indigo fabric - it came with my dragonfly kit. Which is half-done :-(
    I bought my thread in Puyallup at SewExpo.com but I can replenish it here:
    https://www.oneworldfabrics.com/shop/product/olympus-sashiko-thread-1/
    I can see needing the thimble for jean fabric (And possibly the pliers).

    If you need help translating, I have a dear Japanese friend (actually American!) who likes to sew and could translate any weirdness.

    I'll have to haul my half-done pillow cover out of my purse and photograph it for the blog.

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  8. Oh, it's beautiful!!!! There's great information out there on Sashiko technique, between blogs and books. Lookss like it is worthy of obsession.

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Thank you for reading! I'd love to hear from you!